[17], Compared to other owls in the genus Glaucidium, the collared owlet is most active during daylight. Comprehensive life histories for all bird species and families. [3], This bird has a grey-brown colour (depending on age-morph) and has a barred back and flanks, while the head is more spotted than barred. [10] They have prominent white eyebrows, vibrant lemon-yellow-coloured eyes and a white throat patch. Their call starts mellow and becomes shriller with excitement while turning their head in all directions, creating a ventriloquial effect and making it hard to locate the bird. Collared Owlet Glaucidium brodiei. I walked up slowly, call of Chinese Barbet echoed through the forest. Appears in both rufous and gray morphs, both dark above and white below with long, distinct streaks on the flanks. [15] As for its other close relative, a study showed that the jungle owlet was found active in a secondary cavity nest in riparian forests. [3], Species in the genus Glaucidium are secondary cavity-nesters. Its call may be described as a mellow whistled “toot, toot-toot, toot” or “pho, pho-pho, pho”. The collared owlet, being Asia's smallest owl species, measures between 15 and 17 cm. The male produces a 4-note phrase "wüp-wüwü-wüp" repeated at intervals of a few seconds, sometimes having incomplete phrases ending in "wüwü". Take Merlin with you in the field! [5] Females are generally larger than the males, weighing approximately 63 grams, whereas males weigh in at 52 grams. It is the smallest owl in Asia, at 15 cm (5.9 in) and 60 g (2.1 oz). On the third recapture, the individual was 394 days old and was in its final grey morph. Watch Queue Queue. LC Least Concern. [4] Clutch size varies between 3 and 5 hatchlings, and their eggs are round and white. It is the smallest owl in Asia, at 15 cm (5.9 in) and 60 g (2.1 oz). I've predicted Collared Owlet will soon follow, and sure enough someone reported hearing one at Tai Po Kau last week. [8][9], The collared owlet, being Asia's smallest owl species, measures between 15 and 17 cm. On the second recapture, the individual was captured 165 days after hatching and demonstrated a rufous morph; having an overall orange-red colour, barred back, spots on the head and a formed occipital. Typical call - Elevala River, Western Province, Papua New Guinea. Appears in both rufous and gray morphs, both dark above and white below with long, distinct streaks on the flanks. [4], The collared owlet has very unusual but distinctive vocalizations. Tooting song, often given during the day, can be mistaken for that of a barbet, but the Collared Owlet song has four discrete notes, with the second and third notes given close together. The collared owlet (Glaucidium brodiei), also known as the collared pygmy owl,[2] is a species of owl in the family Strigidae. [16] Just like the collared owlet's relatives, this small owl does not create its own nest, but rather nests in natural tree hollows or chambers created by woodpeckers and barbets. Its range extends southwards through Malaysia. Soon as I arrived at the supposed location, I heard a very distant but distinctive 'Hu hu-hu hu' call of the Collared Owlet. The Collared Owlet may hunt at all hours of the day, but is most active at dusk and at night, watching and listening from a high perch for its prey of small birds, rodents, lizards and large insects. Tooting song, often given during the day, can be mistaken for that of a barbet, but the Collared Owlet song has four discrete notes, with the second and third notes given close together. [7], The Sunda owlet (Glaucidium sylvaticum) was formerly treated as a subspecies of the collared owlet. Although the collared owlet is at least concern on the IUCN Red list,[13] its main threat is habitat loss. [3][2] This bird can be found in the following countries: Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, India, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Taiwan, Thailand and Viet Nam. Flight is … [3] The eggs are laid between late April and mid-June and their young are fledged from mid-June to early August. Collared Owlet (Glaucidium brodiei) bird calls and sounds on dibird.com. Speckled Boobook Ninox punctulata. Free, global bird ID and field guide app powered by your sightings and media. On the first capture, the individual was 56 days old and showed fledgling colour morph stage; having less spots and barring on the back and top of the head and not having a completely formed occipital. Its natural habitat is submontane and montane forests with open spaces[3] and is distributed throughout oriental Asia. It was promoted to species status based on the results of a vocalisation study published in 2019. [13], Their preferred habitat varies from evergreen forests, forest edges,[5] mixed deciduous-evergreen forests with oak, rhododendron and fir[14] and open woodlands with scrub. The collared owlet is a resident bird in its range. [11] The chin, center of the breast and belly are mostly white. They commonly fly about, and even hunt and call during the day, despite mobbing by smaller daytime birds. It is found in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. [6] It was moved to the genus Glaucidium based on a comparison of mitochondrial DNA sequences and proved to be closely related to the jungle owlet (Glaucidium radiatum) and the Asian barred owlet (Glaucidium cuculoides). Breeding in Oriental Region: widespread; can be seen in 11 countries. "Glaucidium brodiei (Collared Owlet) - Avibase", "Effects of forest fragmentation on nocturnal Asian birds: A case study from Xishuangbanna, China - 中国学术期刊网络出版总库", Xeno-canto Collared Owlet Range Map and Sounds, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Collared_owlet&oldid=984025110, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 17 October 2020, at 18:25. This video is unavailable. Distribution. Females are generally larger than the males, weighing approximately 63 grams, whereas males weigh in at 52 grams. It mainly relies on a set of high-pitched screams to communicate—either a k-r-r-r-r-ick to advertise itself to other members of its species, or a longer, more forceful shriek to signal distress or a warning. This is known as the "occipital face". [2] Although its small size, this raptor is extremely fierce and has been seen to capture prey as large as itself. [3], Few studies has precisely identified the exact diet of the collared owlet, but we can presume that it is similar to the diet of its closest relative, the jungle owlet. For example, the Asian barred owlet was found to use the nest cavity of a collared scops owl once it was no longer using the nest.