The bone, like the skin of a fresh ham, can also be saved and used as a delicious soup base. Add no salt or seasoning. See. This recipe works equally well served hot with roast potatoes, cauliflower-cheese, braised leeks and Duke of Cumberland sauce, or cold with salad etc and yes it makes great ham … Place in a large pan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. If glazing is desired, score the fat and apply glaze. Place the ham in a large receptacle which might be anything from a big saucepan to a handy bucket - one Christmas we used an old baby's bath - and cover it with cold water. % of people told us that this article helped them. Once your ham is defrosted, remove any skin with a sharp knife and place the meat in a large pot. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Your support helps wikiHow to create more in-depth illustrated articles and videos and to share our trusted brand of instructional content with millions of people all over the world. It retains the flavor, tenderness, and moisture through a gentle simmering process. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. When done, allow the ham to cool in the cooking liquid for several hours. Place ham on a roasting rack set in a roasting pan and diagonally score. If you wish to freeze the ham, you can preserve it in a freezer-safe container for up to a month. Boiling is a good method to use when cooking dry-cured country hams. Good information. I use a boil and roast method which makes the ham really succulent and tender. Country ham is a ham that has been salt-cured and hung up to dry, sometimes for several months at a time. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 4,727 times. wikiHow's. Boiling (or simmering) ham is a moist heat method of cooking. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. To make sure your ham is fully cooked, insert a meat thermometer into the deepest part and keep cooking until it reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit. I wouldn't have known boiling was preferred method for preparing it. https://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--753/boiling-ham.asp To prepare the ham slices, they should have the skin removed from edges and fat trimmed to a thin layer. Please consider making a contribution to wikiHow today. Take the ham out of the fridge two hours before cooking to ensure that it will boil evenly. Carve the ham along the bone if you bought a bone-in ham. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/c\/c6\/Boil-Ham-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Boil-Ham-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/c\/c6\/Boil-Ham-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid10279930-v4-728px-Boil-Ham-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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